Funding news

Text to give

Text to Give – Donations by Phone

When did you last pick up your mobile phone?

When did you last use your phone to pay for something?

84% of the UK now own a smartphone – putting the internet in their pocket. On average people spend 2 hours and 34 minutes online on their smartphones every day. People can browse the internet, shop, view social media and download apps that allow them to do endless tasks.

It’s not new, but the text-to-give process might be the answer for those charities looking for a safe, hygienic giving method that follows social distancing rules. It’s a good option for donors too because it’s quick, they use their own phones and they don’t need to enter credit card information. Charities set up custom keywords preset to a specific donation amount and accept donations in a few quick steps.

£50 million was given in text donations in 2019, making it a serious fundraising contender as more and more people become comfortable using their phones to make payments.

To get started you need a text to donate service provider – have a look at the t&cs of DonrDonate or instaGiv for more information.

https://merchantmachine.co.uk/digital-wallet/

https://charitydigital.org.uk/topics/topics/the-best-uk-charity-text-donation-services-5632

https://www.whitefuse.com/blog/text-to-donate-giving

Copy of Copy of LEGACY FUNRAISING IS

Legacy Fundraising in 5 steps

March is Free Wills Month. More than half of UK adults don’t have a will and this month it’s possible to get a solicitor-written will in return for a small charity donation.

The publicity behind this campaign and Remember a Charity Week later in the year, is a great way for you to introduce/promote a legacy option in your fundraising messages. Here are the fundamentals to get you started:

  1. change the narrative because legacies are not about death – a gift to charity makes a lasting difference, not only for the next generation but for future generations https://stephenwgeorge.com/10-of-the-best-words-to-use-in-legacy-fundraising/2
  2. make it normal by including legacy fundraising in your everyday supporter conversations, emails and charity literature and on your website https://legacyvoice.co.uk/legacy-fundraising-tip-drip-your-legacy-message/
  3. tell stories to help your supporters see the difference their #legacy gift will make and include in all your charity fundraising marketing materials  https://www.goodworksco.ca/upon-time-telling-perfect-legacy-gift-story/
  4. make it easy for your supporters to find the information on your website or ask you a question https://blog.justgiving.com/5-charities-with-stand-out-online-legacy-fundraising
  5. watch the video from Directory of Social Change https://youtu.be/wmY4T57GvAM

Remember that as fundraisers you should be aware of the law – the Fundraising Regulator has the specifics regarding legacies https://www.fundraisingregulator.org.uk/code/specific-fundraising-methods/legacies

make it easy (1)

Social media – make it easy!

You want to inspire and motivate your audience to get involved with your charity by posting great social media with valuable content. You need engagement, retweets, likes, shares, followers, and all the other good things that comes with a successful social media profile. So the question is, what kind of social media content gets that kind of love and gives you the most value?

Who is your audience?

This is a group of people that you’ve identified that you want to appeal to and who are most likely to be interested in your charity. Your audience can be based on location, age, employment or behavior. Look at other similar charities to yours. What content are they publishing? What kind of voice are they using? Who are they appealing to? What’s their call to action?

What is your goal for the social media post/campaign?

Your social media posts should have a purpose – this is a call to action CTA. Do you need donations? Sign up to an email list?  Volunteers? Publicising an event? Your call to action should encourage readers to engage with you further. Be clear what you want your audience to do.

What should you write?

We write about our successes, our beneficiaries, our volunteers, our community and we share local and national social media from partners and charities. Cause awareness and giving days can also be powerful themes for fundraising and social media awareness campaigns. Get ideas from 2021 Cause Awareness Days Days of the Year  Wikipedia’s List of Commemorative Months and download the handy calendar template from Hootsuite for your office wall.

When should you post?

Different audiences on different platforms read posts and view videos at different times of the day. For example, commuters consume social media on their journey to work. Homeworkers may read posts in the middle of the day. Twitter audiences are consuming in the early morning and engagement drops off later in the day. Use the Sprout Socials guide to experiment with posting at different times on different platforms.

How do you make it visually attractive?

Including images is one of the fastest and easiest ways to increase engagement. Our brain can interpret images much quicker than text making your post much more effective. Top tip – make your images the correct size for the platform! We use a free version of an easy to use graphic design platform called Canva and Hootsuite have a guide to getting the sizes right. Remember to use images that belong to you or those from a royalty free site – we use pixabay or unsplash

Finally … make it easy

Posting diverse, interesting content at the right time on the right platform is made much easier by using a scheduling tool. We use Hootsuite. It allows us to plan our content in advance and schedule appropriately across 3 platforms for free. Read about Hootsuite and other scheduling options here.

thriving-communities FB

Thriving Communities Fund

The Thriving Communities Fund will support local voluntary, community, faith and social enterprise projects that bring together place-based partnerships to improve and increase the range and reach of available social prescribing community activities – especially for those people most impacted by COVID19 and health inequalities.

Voluntary, community and faith sector (VCFS) organisations can apply for between £25,000 and £50,000, but to be eligible all applications must:

  • Include 20% match funding, which could include in-kind contribution
  • Evidence a commitment of three core partner organisations – including at least one partner organisation from the arts and culture sector – at the point the application is made.
  • A statement of support from the relevant social prescribing link worker(s)
  • Commitment to work with partner organisations from all of the following sectors in the course of the funded period: Arts, and culture, including libraries, museums and heritage; Sport, leisure and physical activity organisations; Financial wellbeing, advice, food and practical support; Environment and nature-based organisations;  Non-statutory health and care organisations, working with social prescribing link workers.

To support the VCFS to apply for Thriving Communities, Surrey County Council and Surrey Heartlands are running a matching funding and partnership panel. This panel will provide the eligibility requirements set out above. In addition, any applications made to the panel which are unsuccessful at securing Thriving communities funding, will be considered for full funding from Surrey County Council and Surrey Heartlands.

How it will work:

  • VCFS organisation develop their ideas and application, inline with the Thriving Communities application form.
  • If you would like to apply to the SCC/Surrey Heartlands Panel for match funding or partnership commitment, please send a draft copy of your Thriving Communities application to: Rebecca.Brooker@surreycc.gov.uk by 5pm on 5th January, along with the cover template attached, showing clearly what match funding you require.
  • Applications will be reviewed on 6th January by the panel, which will include a social prescribing link worker and representatives of arts and culture, leisure/physical activity, environment and health sectors.
  • The panel will review the applications and decide which will receive match funding and the partnership commitment.
  • Applicants to the panel will be informed whether they have been allocated any match funding by 5pm on 6th January.
  • Applicants will then need to finalise their Thriving Communities application and submit it online, in line with the Thriving Communities requirements and deadline of 8th January.
  • A second panel date will consider if any applications can be fully funded from SCC/Surrey Heartlands if they are unsuccessful at securing Thriving Communities funding.

 

Additional information:

  • The offer of match funding and partnership commitment does not guarantee the applicants success in the Thriving Communities fund. The applicant must apply to the Thriving Communities Fund independently of applying to the panel.
  • Match funding will only be paid on an applicant’s successful award of Thriving Communities funding. If an applicant is unsuccessful at securing Thriving Communities funding, the match funding will not be paid.
  • Applicants can apply to the panel for match funding, partnership commitment or both. What they require should be clear in their application, using the cover template attached.
  • The panel aims to support VCFS application to the Thriving Communities fund. It does not stop applicants progressing an application to Thriving Communities independently. Applicants who do not wish to apply to the panel for match funding or partnership commitment, may progress their application directly with Thriving Communities if they wish.
  • The panel is open to application which will support Surrey residents within all Surrey NHS areas.
  • We understand that deadlines for Thriving Communities are very short, especially with Christmas holidays. We have tried to accommodate these deadlines as much as possible. Applications that are not sufficiently finalised to apply for Thriving Communities will still be considered for potential full funding by SCC/Surrey Heartlands, but applicants will need to share their idea with the panel by 5th January deadline as above.
  • Projects within the Thriving Communities fund will run for a year including planning and delivery time. They are expected to commence on 15 March 2021, and end on 31 March 2022.

 

who are we_ what do we do_ who do we help_ how do we spend our money_

Funders Read Your Charity Website

These days, funders look at your website when you make an application. This is your window to the outside world and it should be current, easy to find, and up to date.

Good website content can:

  • Demonstrate professionalism to funders
  • Show how wisely and economically you spend your budget
  • Demonstrate the impact of your projects and services
  • Showcase your volunteer and community involvement
  • Generate traffic from search engines when your site matches relevant queries
  • Measure what interests your site visitors by using website analytics to be more strategic

Make sure that who you are and what you do is up-to date. Be prepared for funders to check out your website for background information about your projects, beneficiaries and services.

Show the impact of your organisation’s work. Create a space on your website where you feature content that describes work you’re doing, whether in the form of statistics, video, photos, testimonials, stories, or a combination of them all.  A variety of content will create compelling impact pages.

Images get your audiences attention – studies show that people only remember 10% of what they hear once 72 hours have passed. However, if you pair a relevant image with your material, people can remember 65% of the information after three days. Humans process images at an incredible speed which makes them the perfect way to communicate in today’s short-attention world.

Read The Beginners Guide to Nonprofit Website Content for content inspiration

Christmas fundraising campaigns

Christmas Fundraising Campaigns

Sorry to mention the ‘C’ word but if you haven’t started already, it is time to plan and launch your Christmas fundraising campaign.

Christmas inspires people to give and 18% of all charitable giving takes place in December. The most popular month to start Christmas campaigns is November so now is the time to set goals, plan your message with great stories and supporting data, identify your channels and get it out there.

We’ve put together some of the best seasonal guides and blogs for ideas and inspiration – good luck!

Send a charity e-card from Virgin Giving to allow supporters to send e-Christmas cards and then donate you the money they saved on cards and stamps

Six Creative Ideas for a Christmas campaign from Third Sector

Christmas fundraising ideas from Charity Excellence

How to create a great end-of-year campaign message infographic

Everything you wanted to know about Christmas campaigns from Virgin Giving

Wild Apricot’s ultimate guide to year end giving

End of year giving toolkit from Blackbaud

Move Your End of Year Event Online

How to organise a virtual Christmas party for your supporters

Use your Christmas fundraising to better engage your supporters and turn one-off involvement into ongoing support in 2021 and please remember to thank everyone who supports you.

know the law

Trustee Fundraising Responsibilities

The main duty of trustees is to advance the purposes of the charity and to always act in the charity’s best interest.

Trustees take ultimate responsibility for the fundraising activities of their charity, even when they have delegated these roles. They are responsible for ensuring the charity is compliant with the law, ensuring agreements with third party fundraisers are in place and that the relevant licenses/permissions are in place. The way charitable institutions and third-party fundraisers ask for support affects people’s trust and confidence in fundraising.

The Code of Practice from the Fundraising Regulator sets out the behaviour expected from all fundraisers. It includes treating people fairly and with respect, explaining your cause in a way which does not mislead people, and being sensitive to people who may be in vulnerable circumstances.

https://www.fundraisingregulator.org.uk/code

As the regulator of charities in England and Wales, the Charity Commission expects charities that fundraise to do so in a way which protects their charity’s reputation and encourages public trust and confidence in their charity. Trustees face challenges in getting fundraising right and the guidance from the Charity Commission is essential reading to support them in their responsibilities.

https://www.gov.uk/charities-and-fundraising

 

virtual

Top Tips on Organising a Virtual Event

The biggest barrier to participation in a virtual fundraising event are the mechanics of how to get involved.
Here are our 4 top tips on how to organise a virtual event and make it easy for your supporters:
1. Have simple instructions and a central place to sign up and get information. Ideally, a page on your website dedicated to the event and using a tool like Eventbrite.
2. One of the best things about fundraising events is being with people who support the same cause as you. Help participants interact with one another on social media by creating event hashtags and by posting supporter stories on your website event page.
3. Create a fundraising toolkit for your participants, including things like graphics, ideas for social posts or emails, and tips for setting up a personal fundraising page.
4. The biggest benefit of taking your event online is that your fundraiser can last all year. Rather than having one set date for the event, supporters can now sign up to do a virtual walk anytime, making this one-off fundraising opportunity work all year-round.
Surrey County Council Community Fund

Community Projects Fund

Surrey County Council have announced a new capital fund of £100 million over 5 years to support community projects. The Fund is planned to launch later this year and SCC would like representatives from voluntary, community and faith organisations to take part in a series of workshops, to help shape how the Fund will be managed.

The consultation workshops take place via Zoom on the following dates in August:

  • Thursday 20th 14:00 – 15:30 VCSF groups
  • Monday 24th 14:00 – 15:30 VCSF groups (18:00 – 19:30 Residents)
  • Tuesday 25th 14:00 –  15:30 VCSF groups (18:00 – 19:30 Residents)

If you would like to take part in one of these workshops, please contact matthew.snelling@surreycc.gov.uk

Community Projects Fund (Surrey County Council)

“The Community Projects Fund (CPF) is being designed to bring community-led place-making, or place-improving projects to life. It represents a significant opportunity for investment in communities in a meaningful and lasting way. It is being launched in recognition that communities should feel empowered to help shape their local area and builds on the lessons learned from the Council’s previous community grant fund, but aims to be much bolder, and to invest in large community-led projects in a way that will create a real legacy.

The CPF will provide £100m of capital funding to be allocated to community projects over a five-year period. It is intended to support projects put forward by residents, community groups and organisations that meet a set of criteria, designed to ensure the deliverability and sustainability of the proposals put forward. It will specifically provide capital funding – i.e. expenditure relating to an asset such as buildings, equipment, vehicles, public realm rather than cover revenue costs, such as for the running and administration of an organisation. It is intended to be separate to funding for programmes of work where the Council is carrying out its statutory function.

The Fund was already being developed prior to the COVID-19 pandemic however it takes on new importance in the context of recovery and supporting the rebuilding of local communities and groups that have been affected.

Co-design workshops

Surrey County Council want to ensure the CPF meets the requirements of accessibility and deliverability for all communities and potential applicants. We want to ensure the fund is a success and communities benefit.

The aim of the co-design workshops are to test the grant criteria and process that has been developed with residents and community representatives to ensure they will enable the Fund to operate successfully and do not exclude any parts of the county or groups in the community from being able to access it. During the workshops participants will be taken through the application process; helping us to identify any potential barriers to accessing the Fund, or parts that can be streamlined or simplified. The workshops are also being designed to identify the level of support those putting bid applications together, and subsequently delivering projects may require.

The workshops are being designed in collaboration with Council officers and undertaken by an external provider who will facilitate the sessions. They will take the form of five remote 90-minute workshops, each with 4-5 participants. Three of the workshops are proposed to include representation from the VCFS. Ideally we’d like to identify a range of VCFS organisations – in terms of skills, scale or focus – who would be willing to participate.

The findings and recommendations from the co-design work will be used to inform any changes to be made to the process and criteria as required prior to the launch of the Fund.”

15 sec without words

The 15 Second Bounce

Charities must diversify their fundraising strategy, raise their digital profile, increase their supporter base and generate online donations – an out of date website and ignoring social media is not an option.

Your website should be the centre of your communications. Visitors to your site are interested in the people you help, how you help them and how they can get involved.

Please remember that donors fund people not organisations.

You have 15 seconds to capture a visitor’s attention – this is called the 15 second bounce. In those 15 seconds you must stir emotion, empathy and invite engagement.

Menu Options: You should have no more than 5 menu options with short, call to action words:

About    Get Help    Get Involved   Contact Us   Donate

Mission statement: The message on your home page must be simple and immediate ‘We’re ending homelessness and rebuilding lives’

Fundraising: It must be obvious to the donor who you are fundraising for. Donors and funders will check your site to see what you do with your money. Tell beneficiary stories and have project pages with images and totals raised. Keep pages and interest fresh by updating regularly.

Donations: Your donate button should be in the top right of your website and visible on every page. The button should be a different colour from other menu options. No more than 3 clicks to donate from anywhere on your site. Where possible offer different donation values and tell the donor what their money buys.

Tell Stories and Use Images: Site visitors want to hear about real people and their lives. They want to hear stories and quotes from volunteers and beneficiaries about how your intervention improves lives and makes a difference. If you have vulnerable beneficiaries, try copying the image creativity of larger charities to get around the problem of showing faces. Don’t bury your stories deep in the website – they should be easy to find.

Calls to Action: Every web page, email, Tweet, Facebook post should have a call to action – donate, volunteer, contact, support, sign up, share.

Mobile Friendly: Google penalises websites which don’t display well on mobiles or tablets. In 2018 25% of all online donations were made on a mobile.

What are you for? Who do you benefit? Where are they? Show faces and tell stories. You have 15 seconds before I bounce.

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