Runnymede

Copy of arthur

Arthur Birkby Retires as Chairperson of VSNS

Voluntary Support North Surrey announces that Arthur Birkby MBE, Chair, has resigned from VSNS board of trustees as chairperson.
Since 1996, Arthur has led and provided valuable insight and assistance to the organisation. Arthur has served as Chair since the launch of Voluntary Support North Surrey (formerly RAVS). He was responsible for the inception of the organisation and after 15 years’ service he was awarded an MBE in the 2010 New Year’s Honours list for services to Runnymede.
His accomplishments included the successful merger of RAVS and Voluntary Services Surrey Heath and the establishment of Community funds for Runnymede and Surrey Heath. These community funds are a legacy and small grants for charities and voluntary groups will be available in perpetuity.
VSNS’s CEO, Solette Sheppardson, said, “We thank Arthur for his service to Voluntary Support North Surrey as chairperson and we are delighted that Arthur will remain on the board as a trustee. We have grown from a small charity to an established independent charity, improving the lives of many individuals locally. Serving the local community has been central to Arthur’s commitment and motivation throughout his leadership”
Arthur said ‘I have been the chair at VSNS for a long time and I have decided it is the right time to stand down as chairman but remain a trustee. It is healthy for the organisation going forward to elect a new chair to bring fresh energy and insight in delivering our mission together with all of our statutory partners’.
The mission of Voluntary Support North Surrey is to build the capacity of the local voluntary sector by supporting charities and voluntary groups with governance, fundraising, training, volunteering and much more.
We are delighted that Helen Frary has been elected as Chair and feel confident that her skills and experiences with the United Nations will further enrich and develop Voluntary Support North Surrey as she leads our competent and committed board of trustees.
Text to give

Text to Give – Donations by Phone

When did you last pick up your mobile phone?

When did you last use your phone to pay for something?

84% of the UK now own a smartphone – putting the internet in their pocket. On average people spend 2 hours and 34 minutes online on their smartphones every day. People can browse the internet, shop, view social media and download apps that allow them to do endless tasks.

It’s not new, but the text-to-give process might be the answer for those charities looking for a safe, hygienic giving method that follows social distancing rules. It’s a good option for donors too because it’s quick, they use their own phones and they don’t need to enter credit card information. Charities set up custom keywords preset to a specific donation amount and accept donations in a few quick steps.

£50 million was given in text donations in 2019, making it a serious fundraising contender as more and more people become comfortable using their phones to make payments.

To get started you need a text to donate service provider – have a look at the t&cs of DonrDonate or instaGiv for more information.

https://merchantmachine.co.uk/digital-wallet/

https://charitydigital.org.uk/topics/topics/the-best-uk-charity-text-donation-services-5632

https://www.whitefuse.com/blog/text-to-donate-giving

Awareness Month

Stress Awareness Month 2021

According to the Mental Health Foundation 74% of UK adults have felt so stressed at some point over the last year they felt overwhelmed or unable to cope. Everyone experiences stress differently. Sometimes it may feel obvious when you’re feeling stressed but at other times it may creep up on you. Mental health charity Mind have guidance on signs of stress and how it might make you feel.

If you feel overwhelmed and need help to get your wellbeing back, we’ve put together some local and national links with ideas for self care and agencies who can help you.

NHS recommended Apps https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/apps/

Stress Busters https://www.nhs.uk/mental-health/self-help/guides-tools-and-activities/tips-to-reduce-stress/

NHS Every Mind Matters https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/stress/ and https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/anxiety/

Healthy Surrey https://www.healthysurrey.org.uk/mental-wellbeing/adults/local-services

Mind Matters Talking Therapies SABP https://www.mindmattersnhs.co.uk/

Woking Mind https://wokingmind.org.uk/

Catalyst https://www.catalystsupport.org.uk/

Helplines and Crisis Contacts  https://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk/helplines-and-crisis-contacts

Finally, why not try the Stress Management Society ’30 Day Challenge’ which encourages you to pick one action each for your physical, mental and emotional wellbeing to carry out every day. It takes 30 days to turn actions into habits which could enable you to turn useful knowledge and techniques into positive change https://www.stress.org.uk/stressawarenessmonth/ 

Untitled design

Compass Group Chertsey donate Rucksacks to Just a Helping Hand

Compass Group who are one of the UK’s top catering, hospitality, and business support providers, based in Chertsey, have been helping the local homeless with the donation of rucksacks.

Megan at Just a Helping Hand told us

“To have this amazing donation of rucksacks is honestly just incredible, and we are truly grateful.

We have many distributors who issue rucksacks to those who need them most. One such group is women who are released from prison. Many of these women being released are homeless and some come from domestic abuse situations.  We take this into account when filling these rucksacks.

Can you imagine the feelings of these women when they open their rucksack and find such lovely things as a wash bag filled with deodorant, toothpaste and toothbrush, nail file, and lip balm.  But there is much more – including a pack of new socks and underwear, a flask (with refill information for free at local outlets), hat, scarf and gloves, meal vouchers, and a small Bible.

Such an act of kindness makes such a difference to them from both a practical and an emotional point of view.  It has been said to us that such generosity from a stranger provides a real sense of being cared for and thought about.  This can ease anxiety, provide hope, help with depression and even remove thoughts of suicide”

 

Copy of Copy of LEGACY FUNRAISING IS

Legacy Fundraising in 5 steps

March is Free Wills Month. More than half of UK adults don’t have a will and this month it’s possible to get a solicitor-written will in return for a small charity donation.

The publicity behind this campaign and Remember a Charity Week later in the year, is a great way for you to introduce/promote a legacy option in your fundraising messages. Here are the fundamentals to get you started:

  1. change the narrative because legacies are not about death – a gift to charity makes a lasting difference, not only for the next generation but for future generations https://stephenwgeorge.com/10-of-the-best-words-to-use-in-legacy-fundraising/2
  2. make it normal by including legacy fundraising in your everyday supporter conversations, emails and charity literature and on your website https://legacyvoice.co.uk/legacy-fundraising-tip-drip-your-legacy-message/
  3. tell stories to help your supporters see the difference their #legacy gift will make and include in all your charity fundraising marketing materials  https://www.goodworksco.ca/upon-time-telling-perfect-legacy-gift-story/
  4. make it easy for your supporters to find the information on your website or ask you a question https://blog.justgiving.com/5-charities-with-stand-out-online-legacy-fundraising
  5. watch the video from Directory of Social Change https://youtu.be/wmY4T57GvAM

Remember that as fundraisers you should be aware of the law – the Fundraising Regulator has the specifics regarding legacies https://www.fundraisingregulator.org.uk/code/specific-fundraising-methods/legacies

#DontSufferinSilence

Time to Talk 2021

Talking about your feelings can help you stay in good mental health. Talking about your feelings isn’t a sign of weakness. Talking about your feelings is part of taking charge of your well being and doing what you can to stay healthy.

At the moment we are all worried. Don’t suffer in silence – talk to someone:

Carers Support

Befriending and Loneliness

Mental Health

Domestic Abuse

If you are in crisis please call the Crisis Mental Health Helpline 0800 915 4644 – open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for mental health advice and support

make it easy (1)

Social media – make it easy!

You want to inspire and motivate your audience to get involved with your charity by posting great social media with valuable content. You need engagement, retweets, likes, shares, followers, and all the other good things that comes with a successful social media profile. So the question is, what kind of social media content gets that kind of love and gives you the most value?

Who is your audience?

This is a group of people that you’ve identified that you want to appeal to and who are most likely to be interested in your charity. Your audience can be based on location, age, employment or behavior. Look at other similar charities to yours. What content are they publishing? What kind of voice are they using? Who are they appealing to? What’s their call to action?

What is your goal for the social media post/campaign?

Your social media posts should have a purpose – this is a call to action CTA. Do you need donations? Sign up to an email list?  Volunteers? Publicising an event? Your call to action should encourage readers to engage with you further. Be clear what you want your audience to do.

What should you write?

We write about our successes, our beneficiaries, our volunteers, our community and we share local and national social media from partners and charities. Cause awareness and giving days can also be powerful themes for fundraising and social media awareness campaigns. Get ideas from 2021 Cause Awareness Days Days of the Year  Wikipedia’s List of Commemorative Months and download the handy calendar template from Hootsuite for your office wall.

When should you post?

Different audiences on different platforms read posts and view videos at different times of the day. For example, commuters consume social media on their journey to work. Homeworkers may read posts in the middle of the day. Twitter audiences are consuming in the early morning and engagement drops off later in the day. Use the Sprout Socials guide to experiment with posting at different times on different platforms.

How do you make it visually attractive?

Including images is one of the fastest and easiest ways to increase engagement. Our brain can interpret images much quicker than text making your post much more effective. Top tip – make your images the correct size for the platform! We use a free version of an easy to use graphic design platform called Canva and Hootsuite have a guide to getting the sizes right. Remember to use images that belong to you or those from a royalty free site – we use pixabay or unsplash

Finally … make it easy

Posting diverse, interesting content at the right time on the right platform is made much easier by using a scheduling tool. We use Hootsuite. It allows us to plan our content in advance and schedule appropriately across 3 platforms for free. Read about Hootsuite and other scheduling options here.

January 2021

January 2021 is Mentoring Month

Mentoring can have a significant impact on a young person’s life, prospects and outlook. In addition to better school attendance and a better chance of going on to higher education, mentored young people maintain better attitudes toward school – 46% less likely than their peers to start using illegal drugs – 27% less likely to start drinking – 81% more likely to participate regularly in sports or extracurricular activities than those who do not. Being a mentor gives a young person someone to rely on, provide emotional support, educational and career guidance and generally be a guide.

Interested? Here are a few local ideas:

Forward Trust – make a difference to the lives of ex offenders and people with drug and alcohol issues

Surrey Care Trust – work with vulnerable families who need help to cope with life’s challenges or support taking their next steps in life

PACT – Prison Advice and Care Trust volunteers support prisoners resettling back through practical and emotional support

or have a look at some of the many and varied mentor roles on our volunteer website

thriving-communities FB

Thriving Communities Fund

The Thriving Communities Fund will support local voluntary, community, faith and social enterprise projects that bring together place-based partnerships to improve and increase the range and reach of available social prescribing community activities – especially for those people most impacted by COVID19 and health inequalities.

Voluntary, community and faith sector (VCFS) organisations can apply for between £25,000 and £50,000, but to be eligible all applications must:

  • Include 20% match funding, which could include in-kind contribution
  • Evidence a commitment of three core partner organisations – including at least one partner organisation from the arts and culture sector – at the point the application is made.
  • A statement of support from the relevant social prescribing link worker(s)
  • Commitment to work with partner organisations from all of the following sectors in the course of the funded period: Arts, and culture, including libraries, museums and heritage; Sport, leisure and physical activity organisations; Financial wellbeing, advice, food and practical support; Environment and nature-based organisations;  Non-statutory health and care organisations, working with social prescribing link workers.

To support the VCFS to apply for Thriving Communities, Surrey County Council and Surrey Heartlands are running a matching funding and partnership panel. This panel will provide the eligibility requirements set out above. In addition, any applications made to the panel which are unsuccessful at securing Thriving communities funding, will be considered for full funding from Surrey County Council and Surrey Heartlands.

How it will work:

  • VCFS organisation develop their ideas and application, inline with the Thriving Communities application form.
  • If you would like to apply to the SCC/Surrey Heartlands Panel for match funding or partnership commitment, please send a draft copy of your Thriving Communities application to: Rebecca.Brooker@surreycc.gov.uk by 5pm on 5th January, along with the cover template attached, showing clearly what match funding you require.
  • Applications will be reviewed on 6th January by the panel, which will include a social prescribing link worker and representatives of arts and culture, leisure/physical activity, environment and health sectors.
  • The panel will review the applications and decide which will receive match funding and the partnership commitment.
  • Applicants to the panel will be informed whether they have been allocated any match funding by 5pm on 6th January.
  • Applicants will then need to finalise their Thriving Communities application and submit it online, in line with the Thriving Communities requirements and deadline of 8th January.
  • A second panel date will consider if any applications can be fully funded from SCC/Surrey Heartlands if they are unsuccessful at securing Thriving Communities funding.

 

Additional information:

  • The offer of match funding and partnership commitment does not guarantee the applicants success in the Thriving Communities fund. The applicant must apply to the Thriving Communities Fund independently of applying to the panel.
  • Match funding will only be paid on an applicant’s successful award of Thriving Communities funding. If an applicant is unsuccessful at securing Thriving Communities funding, the match funding will not be paid.
  • Applicants can apply to the panel for match funding, partnership commitment or both. What they require should be clear in their application, using the cover template attached.
  • The panel aims to support VCFS application to the Thriving Communities fund. It does not stop applicants progressing an application to Thriving Communities independently. Applicants who do not wish to apply to the panel for match funding or partnership commitment, may progress their application directly with Thriving Communities if they wish.
  • The panel is open to application which will support Surrey residents within all Surrey NHS areas.
  • We understand that deadlines for Thriving Communities are very short, especially with Christmas holidays. We have tried to accommodate these deadlines as much as possible. Applications that are not sufficiently finalised to apply for Thriving Communities will still be considered for potential full funding by SCC/Surrey Heartlands, but applicants will need to share their idea with the panel by 5th January deadline as above.
  • Projects within the Thriving Communities fund will run for a year including planning and delivery time. They are expected to commence on 15 March 2021, and end on 31 March 2022.

 

who are we_ what do we do_ who do we help_ how do we spend our money_

Funders Read Your Charity Website

These days, funders look at your website when you make an application. This is your window to the outside world and it should be current, easy to find, and up to date.

Good website content can:

  • Demonstrate professionalism to funders
  • Show how wisely and economically you spend your budget
  • Demonstrate the impact of your projects and services
  • Showcase your volunteer and community involvement
  • Generate traffic from search engines when your site matches relevant queries
  • Measure what interests your site visitors by using website analytics to be more strategic

Make sure that who you are and what you do is up-to date. Be prepared for funders to check out your website for background information about your projects, beneficiaries and services.

Show the impact of your organisation’s work. Create a space on your website where you feature content that describes work you’re doing, whether in the form of statistics, video, photos, testimonials, stories, or a combination of them all.  A variety of content will create compelling impact pages.

Images get your audiences attention – studies show that people only remember 10% of what they hear once 72 hours have passed. However, if you pair a relevant image with your material, people can remember 65% of the information after three days. Humans process images at an incredible speed which makes them the perfect way to communicate in today’s short-attention world.

Read The Beginners Guide to Nonprofit Website Content for content inspiration

© Copyright 2017 Voluntary Support North Surrey. Privacy Policy. Registered Charity Incorporated Organisation Number 1141587